1970's, 2000's, Horror, Ridley Scott, Science Fiction

ALIEN: DIRECTOR’S CUT (1979/2003) – QUICK REVIEW


1979/2003

DIRECTOR: Ridley Scott

80/100

Alien is Ridley Scott’s first major hit after The Duelists (1977), and one which probably more of a impact if we are honest.

This arogorical take on the haunted house set in space where “no-one can hear you scream”, the former advert director, probably best known for his Hovis ad in the 70’s, would make his name and redefine the genre of horror in the vaccume of space.

As John Hurt’s chest explodes all over the dinner table after being attacked by the late H.R. Gieger’s now infamous facehugger, sci-fi was about to evolve into something which pushed the boundaries, blending a matter of fact, cynical world, with realistic characters facing off against a frightening, perfect predator, the Xenomorph.

With acid for blood and an appetite to feed on the ships small crew, alone in deep space, Alien would seemlessly blend the tropes of science fiction and horror with the skill of a director with an innovative mind and eye for detail, no matter how small.

The sets, the alien anatomy and the human interactions were all so fresh and engrossing for the genre at this time.

The only real let down are some of the effects, namely those set in space. Most were acceptable for the time, though Star Wars, Star Trek and even films such as Close Encounters where doing it better but it was the final explosion of the Naustramo itself which seemed to be out of place.

It was clearly animated and it looked terrible. More so because it was out of place next to the rest of film which was way ahead of it time with its production values.

All in all this is a good film, innovative and an influential sci-fi classic.